For the great landscape painter J.M.W. Turner, the river Thames provided him with a huge source of inspiration, from his childhood in the early 1780s to the end of his life in 1851. He was particularly enthralled by the Arcadian stretch of the river as it winds past Richmond and Twickenham, where he chose to build his retreat, Sandycombe Lodge. This talk takes its title from the 18th century Richmond poet, James Thomson, whose work was still much admired many decades after his death, and whose verses were in Turner's mind as he walked and sketched his way along Richmond Hill to capture the moods of the river and the famous view.

Catherine Parry-Wingfield is an art historian with a long career in teaching and lecturing, specialising in the visual arts of 18th and early 19th century Britain and Europe. She was a trustee of Turner's House Trust from its inception in 2005, and chair from 2013 to 2019, during which time she was actively engaged as a member of the conservation project team, particularly with the presentation of the interior. She has written two booklets, J.M.W. Turner, R.A. - the artist and his house at Twickenham and J.M.W. Turner and the 'Matchless Vale of Thames' (available from Turner's House) and an article for The London Gardener, 2012, The Grounds of Sandycombe Lodge, J.M.W. Turner's Country Retreat at Twickenham.

More Information

  • Talks will last 30 minutes followed by a Q&A. Tickets grant access to all 4 talks. Joining information will be sent on the morning of the event.
  • Ticket price £15
  • Purchase tickets online

Venue

Online

Event Sponsor

Turner's House

April
Tuesday
20
7pm